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Your folder from files.brandeis.edu  ( "name_of_your_share" in the notes here below ) can be accessed  either via  Nautilus or using gvfs-mount from the command line , using your UNET ID ( "your_username" here below ) and password.

In some cases, it may be useful or necessary to use root access to mount the share.

Solution 1: Nautilus remote connection


There ( at least ) two ways of achieving the same results using this tool:

OPTION1:

Use the nautilus resource explorer under the menu Places -> Computer 

write the address    smb://USERS;your_username@files.brandeis.edu/name-of-your-share

 

Gnome will ask you to input your UNET password ( like here ):

 

Insert your password and click connect. 

 A Nautilus window will open showing you the content of  the remote folder.

Once the window is open you can click on the menu Bookmark -> Add Bookmark,  so that next time you can connect simply clicking on the bookmark under the menu Places

 

OPTION 2

Use the menu Places ->  Connect to Server and fill in the information in the configuration pop-up tab as shown here :

 

Gnome will ask you to input your UNET password ( like here ):

 

Insert your password and click connect.

 A Nautilus window will open showing you the content of  the remote folder.

Solution 2: gvfs-mount from the command line. 


You can mount the remote folder from the terminal using the gnome virtual file system tools .

Upon mounting, the folder will appear as a network location on your desktop and on the nautilus navigation menu.

If your user is part of the "fuse" group, the mounted folder will also be accessible from the terminal in  ~/.gfvs/    :

 

IMPORTANT NOTE : if you are connected remotely, you need to open a message bus  before being able to mount :

 

Solution 3: use root privileges to mount the share

Generally this will require the package cifs-utils to be installed. 

  1. create a mount point (in this case, /mnt/bio-office)
  2. use the command mount with the option -t cifs to mount the remote share at the mount point. 
  3. once the share is mounted, switch back to your unprivileged (non-root) user account to work.
    1. in the example below, username=karel is the username on files.brandeis.edu; uid=karelsf indicates that I want the share to be owned by local user karelsf when mounted)
  4. when done, use the command umount to umount the share.
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